From the remarkable works of Chris Foss, to the stunning art of Beau Lamb, the visual influences in No Man’s Sky are undeniable. An homage to the golden age of 1970’s science fiction, this latest entry in IGN’s month of No Man’s Sky doesn’t disappoint and is of a slightly different format than we have seen to date. 

Home Is Where The Art Is

The video is nothing we haven’t seen from other promotional spots for games. We get a formula of shots that dance between testimony from the developers, cuts of game footage and brief glimpses of the studio environment where the game is created. One can’t help but feel the ache of nostalgia as the camera pans over a collection of books containing a plethora of art work of an era long gone. I remember how excited I’d felt as a boy when we would visit my eccentric uncle. He had a library of these books and a stack of Heavy Metal mags for me to lose myself with images of starships and alien worlds. Little did I know that those Chris Foss images would one day come to life in a procedurally generated universe I could explore while in my robe and slippers, sipping coffee from my favourite Star Wars mug.

Art by Chris Foss

Art by Chris Foss

I Art, Therefore I Am

Who among us has sat down and drawn a space ship, a strange alien or something other worldly? What kind of world did you imagine visiting? Influences for the look of No Man’s Sky come from adults who, in some part, never grew up. They still dream in colours we’ve never seen or just taken for granted. I would imagine that this is true of our friends at Hello Games. However the team goes on to explain that in this application, something as small as an alien ear can live in a procedural system and find it’s way to the make-up of more than one creature. The challenge of maintaining the integrity of a clear artistic vision in a universe based in mathematics is daunting. This would be like saying the Mona Lisa is the result of a complex equation rather than a painting that came from the soul of an artistic genius. For what it’s worth, I for one cannot fathom the complexity of making an entire universe and all of it’s things consistently beautiful. Maybe that is the true allure of No Man’s Sky. The sheer wonder in it’s conception and the achievement of bringing childhood dreams to life.

Art by Beau Lamb

Art by Beau Lamb

Who Art In Heaven

Whether you were a fan of the sci-fi art of the 60’s and 70’s or a dedicated gamer of the 21st century, you can’t deny that this game, we have been patiently waiting for, is looking more fantastic with every glimpse. It could be that once we land on our first planet, even the most hardcore PVP gamers of us will pause, just for a moment, and drink it all in. Take the time to appreciate your surroundings, tread carefully and keep your eyes on the horizon. That advice may not only change your perspective on where video games are headed, it just might save your life as well. At it’s core though, it’s imaginative works like this that not only entertain us, but give us an opportunity to learn about ourselves.

Art by Chris Foss

Art by Chris Foss

We at The Galactic Observer want to hear from you. We are building a community for No Man’s Sky unlike any other. After and leading up to the game’s release we will be adding forums and wikis to share our adventures and discoveries. Please comment below or drop us a line with your comments and suggestions.

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Ryan Brooks
Ryan Brooks
Managing Editor at the Galactic Observer
Ryan is a veteran from the advertising set. An art director and writer from Toronto, Canada, Ryan has been a science fiction aficionado since 1977 when his father took him to see a little known space opera called Star Wars. Gaming is a passion shared by his wife and three year old son. For Ryan, a good story is one of the most important aspects of the games he plays. Especially if you get to create the story yourself.